#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

#atalanta #seriea #nike #bergamo

2014/15 Atalanta Serie A kits with new sponsor SuisseGas estimated to be a seven figure sum. Also La Dea have also made a new deal with Nike to become their kit manufacturer

2014/15 Atalanta Serie A kits with new sponsor SuisseGas estimated to be a seven figure sum. Also La Dea have also made a new deal with Nike to become their kit manufacturer

thegentlemanultra:

THE CLARK STUPPLE COLUMN

Every week Clark takes a look deep into Italy’s Ultra culture


Ultra Culture: Left Wing, Right Wing We Hate You Because Your Not One Of Us

Many British people make the common misconception that Ultras and Hooligans are one and the same thing but they couldn’t be more wrong if they tried.

hooligan  
hoo·li·gan [hoo-li-guhn]
noun: hooligan; plural noun: hooligans
1.
a violent young troublemaker, typically one of a gang.
“a football hooligan”
synonyms:​hoodlum, thug, lout, delinquent, tearaway, vandal, ruffian, rowdy, troublemaker;
Origin: late 19th century: perhaps from Hooligan, the surname of a fictional rowdy Irish family in a music-hall song of the 1890s, also of a cartoon character.

ultra  
ul·tra [uhl-truh]
noun informal
1.
an extremist.
“ultras in the animal rights movement”
synonyms:​extremist, radical, fanatic, zealot, diehard, revolutionary, rebel, militant, subversive

Origin: Ultra-Royalists or simply Ultras were a reactionary faction which sat in the French parliament from 1815 to 1830 under the Bourbon Restoration. The Legitimists, another of the main right-wing families identified in René Rémond’s classic opus Les Droites en France, were disparagingly classified with the Ultras after the 1830 July Revolution by the victors, the Orleanists, who deposed the Bourbon dynasty for the more liberal king Louis-Philippe.

One of they many things that separate Ultras from just common football hooligans is their stance on politics, and the Italian Ultra scene is without doubt one of the most political ultra movements in the world.

Traditionally rivalries within football were created due to geographical location or a competitive title run-in but in Italy rivalries have been created due to what their groups of fans believe in off the field a prime example is Livorno and Atalanta’s hatred for Lazio, Internazionale, Juventus, Roma and Hellas Verona the only thing that connects all five clubs is that they are all associated with Right Wing political ideologies where Livorno and Atalanta are said to be traditionally extreme Left Wing.

The vast majority of Ultras groups in Italy could be classed as Right Wing while only small minority of them are considered to be leftwards leaning Livorno, Atalanta, Empoli, Ternana, Ancona, Perugia, Pisa and Modena followed by a hand full of others complete the list.

In recent years some Ultras groups have opted to abandon their political views and leave them outside of the Stadiums. Atalanta Ultras are now considered to be non-political since the Bocia encouraged all the Ultras groups such as the BNA Wild Kaos Atalanta and Nuova Gurdia to be disbanded and reformed under a new single umbrella known simply as the “Curva Nord” where their religion and political opinion among other things was left at the turn style and all that mattered was their common love for Atalanta, the colors of the club and their love for the city of Bergamo. Although a small group of Left Wing extremists chose not to join and can now be seen in the Curva Sud quite often waving flags and banners associated to Left wing believes and socialist icon Che Guevara.

Since the increase of immigration many Italians have decided to take more right wing views this has seen local rivals such as Lazio and Roma and Internazionale and AC Milan share the same political opinions and in turn this has led to Italian Ultras taking up more of the British approach to who they choose to make their foe. Indecently AC Milan where traditionally non political although they did have a slight lean towards the left as many of their founding fans where humble working class railway work who felt harshly treated by a right wing government. They are now more associated to being right wing mainly due to there club president and former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi who has strong right wing ties.

thegentlemanultra:

Ultra Culture: The dawning of a new age

When the Italian ultra scene hit its lowest point so did its football. Attendances plummeted, clubs fell on hard financial times, and high profile players found bigger and better stages to perform on.

“Football is nothing without fans” World Famous Ultras/ Casuals phrase 

The Italian Ultra scene never truly died groups like Lazio’s Irriducibili, Internazionale’s Boys San Atalanta’s Curva Nord and Juventus’s Drughi to name but a few still lived on but the true Ultras that made up the heart of groups were simply no longer there. In many ways the groups just carried on the name but many of those involved couldn’t really be classed as Ultras.

Since the 1980s Ultra culture walked side by side with fashion and just like the fashion industry trends come and go, the Ultra scene is just warming up for its biggest come back in years. Incidentally the terrace casual look appears to be making a return to the high street too.

As with all Ultra movements, it is a case of not letting someone else out do you and with the ever-increasing appearance of pyro making its way into the English game, the Italians are not ready to be retired yet. 

This season alone we have already seen some more than promising signs of an Italian Ultra scene emerging from the flames like a phoenix. At Parma we have seen some really impressive pyro and flag displays this season and with it what looks like the reforming of their old Ultra group “The Boys Parma 1977.” (Above)

Bologna have also shown in recent weeks that they are not to be overlooked when it comes to Ultra Culture, despite their poor performances on the pitch they have packed the Curva at the Stadio Renato Dall’Ara on many occasions bringing back memories from their glory days of the 1990s. Only last week the Bologna Ultras organized a march through the city center to demonstrate their discontent at how President Albert Guaraldi is running the club. (Above)

The return of a couple of small time Ultras groups is nothing to write home about but it is the signs that are coming from deep inside real Ultras groups. These are groups that demand respect and honor are the ones that give us an indication that a new era of Ultras are on the rise.

Earlier this season 93 Sampdoria Ultras were caught trying to gain access to their away fixture with Livorno without a Tessera, at first this may seem a little dumb if anything but if you look deeper into it the truth really shines through.

Why would 93 people travel over 175 kilometers to a game without a ticket let alone have permission to purchase a ticket? Why Livorno? When there are a handful of sides nearer with a larger rivalry that would surely be more appealing to take a chance on. And more importantly why such a large number of people that have never held a Tessera all decide to travel all on one day?

t is simple, just because 93 were caught going to Livorno it doesn’t mean that it was the first time they have travelled,  it purely means it is the first time they have been found.

The 93 were all handed DASP (banning orders) but only a couple of weeks later all chargers were dropped.

In some cases the return of the Ultra scene is a new age of ultra, a younger generation trying to recapture those dreams that they have heard their elders. Reminiscing about in other cases it is the thrill of the revival that is bringing some of the original ultras out of retirement either way that feeling of belonging and being part of something is what has sparked the revival.  

Next week we will be discussing how the Ultra movement coincides with the social and economical climate at the current time

By Clark Stupple @Clarkiebaby

Simone Tiribocchi 

Simone Tiribocchi 

Atalanta’s win at the San Siro last season

Atalanta’s win at the San Siro last season